Belgian witnesses decline in COVID patients, hospitals consists only 1000 patients

Belgium: The maximum number of Covid-19 patients in the hospitals of Belgium has fallen below 1,000 for the first time since June 19, according to the most recent data from the Sciensano national health institution.

Due to 68 people remaining in intensive care units, 23 percent fewer patients require intensive care.

Advertisement

Between August 16 and August 22, an average of 1,947 new infections were reported per day, a minor rise of 14 percent from the prior week. There are 221 confirmed cases per 100,000 people during a 14-day period.

Fewer exams were administered during the prior session due to a public holiday. An average of 8,296 tests were administered per day from August 16 to August 22, a marginal increase of 5 percent.

With a Positive ratio of 24,8 percent or one in four tests, there was a little decline of 0,6 percent.

Additionally, the reproduction rate has dropped by 5 percent and is now at 0.86. The fact that the figure is less than 1 shows that the epidemic is slowing down.

93.5 percent of infections, or almost all infections, are caused by the variation BA.5.

An average of 71 patients were admitted to hospitals per day from August 19 to August 25, a weekly decrease of 19 percent. But according to Sciensano, since mid-May, there have been no additional hospitalizations in the province of Luxembourg as a result of a cyberattack on the Vivalia network, an inter-municipal healthcare organization.

ADV

Nine hundred sixty-five persons with a Covid infection are now being admitted to hospitals, which is an 18 percent decrease from the prior time frame. When those figures were last that low, it was in June.

Furthermore, every day, eight people still die from the consequences of an infection, but that, too, is a 16 percent decrease compared to the previous period. In total, 32,496 people with a confirmed Covid-19 infection have died in Belgium since the start of the pandemic.

Hot Topics

Related Articles

Translate »